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ENGL2126/LALS3002 - Law, Meaning and Interpretation
Semester
2019-2020 First Semester
Credits
6.00
Contact Hours per week
3
Form of Assessment
100% coursework
Time
Friday , 2:30 pm - 5:20 pm , CPD-G.02
Prerequisite
Passed 3 introductory courses (with at least one from both List A and List B). For students in BA&LLB, successful completion of LALS2001 Introduction to law and literary studies will also fulfill 6 credits of introductory ENGL course (List B) for English non-majors.

 

Please note that there will be no lecture on Friday September 27 and that there will be a makeup class in Reading Week (Friday, October 18, 14:30 - 17:20, CPD-G.02 ).

This course offers a multidisciplinary introduction to key debates on language and interpretation within legal theory, and to the interface between the study of language and the discipline of law. This course begins with an introduction to interpretation as reflecting a set of pervasive intellectual problems in the study of literature, religion, language and culture. It then moves on to the study of legal interpretation, focusing on word meaning in law. The course stresses the sociopolitical dimension to interpretative questions confronted by judges. The presentation of theories of language and law is complemented by exercises drawn from decided cases or which reflect real-life legal dilemmas. Law is seen in the context of issues such as authority and power; doubt and certainty; meaning and indeterminacy. No technical knowledge of law, linguistics or literary theory is assumed.

Topics
  1. An introduction to meaning and interpretation through examples: concepts, approaches and issues
  2. Interpretation as a pervasive question in relation to religious and literary texts
  3. Linguistic approaches to lexical meaning and questions of ambiguity, polysemy, vagueness, and indeterminacy
  4. Legal approaches to meaning and interpretation, focussing on “ordinary meaning”
  5. Jurisprudential debates about legal interpretation and the question of indeterminacy
  6. Decided cases concerning classification of objects, events, activities and people
  7. Settling the contested meaning of words in different contexts
  8. Expertise and interpretation: linguists, judges, literary critics and ordinary speakers
Objectives

Students will gain an understanding of the fundamental interpretative dilemmas of law, and the relationship of these both to the socio-political context of legal rules, and to debates within the humanities about interpretative authority. They will gain diagnostic and analytic skills in relation to language in legal problems, and an understanding of the limits of legal certainty.

Organisation

The course has three timetabled hours per week. The first two hours involve a mixture of lecture and in-class exercises. Students will be given extensive opportunities to analyze problem cases. The third hour will be used as required for review of case materials, for informal discussion, and for student presentations. Final arrangements for the use of the third hour will depend on the number of students enrolled.

Please note that there will be no lecture on Friday September 27 and that there will be a makeup class in Reading Week.

Assessment

The primary requirements are a mid-term essay/project of 1500 words plus a presentation (30% of final grade) and a final essay of 3000 words (70% of final grade). The final essay requires engagement both with actual cases and the theoretical debates introduced during the course.

Texts

The primary text is Word Meaning and Legal Interpretation (C.M. Hutton, Palgrave, 2014). Students will be given weekly handouts or shown powerpoints outlining the basic concepts, , and will be directed to relevant readings in law and linguistics journals. There are many relevant journals, including the International Journal of Speech language and the Law; Yale Journal of Law & Humanities; Law & Literature.

Points to note
  • No technical knowledge of law, literary theory and linguistics required – but these are technical subjects with their own specialized terminology
  • Lecture + workshop format
  • The emphasis is on understanding and applying interpretative theory to real legal questions and social problems

Semester
2019-2020 First Semester
Credits
6.00
Contact Hours per week
3
Form of Assessment
100% coursework
Time
Friday , 2:30 pm - 5:20 pm , CPD-G.02
Prerequisite
Passed 3 introductory courses (with at least one from both List A and List B). For students in BA&LLB, successful completion of LALS2001 Introduction to law and literary studies will also fulfill 6 credits of introductory ENGL course (List B) for English non-majors.