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ENGL1017 - Introduction to sociolinguistics
Semester
2019-2020 Second Semester
Credits
6.00
Contact Hours per week
3
Form of Assessment
100% coursework
Time
Monday , 12:30 pm - 2:20 pm , CPD-LG.09
Thursday , 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm , CPD-LG.09

 

This course introduces students to the field of sociolinguistics—a cross-disciplinary study of the relationship between language and society with insights from linguistics, sociology, psychology and linguistic anthropology. For decades, sociolinguists have looked for ways to understand human social behaviours and organisation by studying what people do with language and why. This course provides a basic foundation for students who are interested in the scholarly research of language in social contexts, as well as for those who want to develop a critical perspective of their own social and linguistic worlds.

Topics
• The historical development of sociolinguistics as a discipline
• Sociolinguistic research methods, theories and applications
• Language variation and change
• Language choice and multilingualism (code-switching, translanguaging)
• Language contact, maintenance, shift, birth and death
• Pidgins and creoles
• Linguistic (super-)diversity  
• Language policy and planning
• Language attitudes and ideologies
• Language and identity
• World Englishes and globalisation
Objectives
The goals of this course are three-fold. First, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of sociolinguistics (key terms, major concepts and sociolinguistic methodology), enabling them to understand the aims and historical development of the discipline. Second, students will be trained to analyse sociolinguistic studies, both old and new, and engage in critical thinking about the process of scholarly research. Students will also be encouraged to explore the connections between the discipline and their world, and build awareness of power and political issues related to language use globally as well as in specific contexts.
Organisation
The course consists of two-hour lectures on Mondays and one-hour tutorials on Thursday. The lectures provide detailed overviews of relevant topics in sociolinguistics. In the tutorials students will be given opportunities to engage with the materials through in-class discussion, presentations and group work and thereby develop their knowledge and understanding of the concepts, theories and approaches we discuss in this course.
Assessment
  1. Final essay: 50%
  2. Two reflections on learning experiences: 40% (20% each)
  3. Tutorial contribution and participation: 10%
Office hours

Please make individual arrangements to see Jaspal and discuss your learning experience, your final essay and clarify any questions you might have.

Study Load
Activities   Number of hours
Lectures   20 hours
Tutorials   5 hours
Reading / Self-study   80 hours
Writing reflective journal   10 hours
Final written assessment   30 hours
Total   145 hours
Syllabus and readings

This course syllabus lists topics and readings for each session, together with information about the deadlines for assessments. For detailed information on assessments, see the “Assessments” document. You are expected to read all core readings listed below in preparation for class. Many core readings can be found in Rajend Mesthrie, Joan Swann, Ana Deumert, and William L. Leap (2013) Introducing Sociolinguistics. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. The book can be purchased or accessed as an ebook or hardcopy via the HKU library. References to further readings will be provided in each session. Students are expected to complete substantial amounts of reading and self-study every week and read widely and independently in preparation for their final essay. Students are also expected to actively participate in the tutorials and reflect on their learning progress by writing a journal.

Week 1 Introduction: Studying language variation in society

  • Mesthrie, Rajend (2013) Clearing the ground: Basic issues, concepts and approaches. In: Rajend Mesthrie, Joan Swann, Ana Deumert, and William L. Leap (eds.) Introducing Sociolinguistics. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1–41.

Week 2 ***Lunar New Year, no classes***

Week 3 Regional and social dialectology

  • Mesthrie, Rajend (2013) Regional dialectology & Social dialectology. In Rajend Mesthrie, Joan Swann, Ana Deumert, and William L. Leap (eds.) Introducing Sociolinguistics. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 42–72 & 73–108.
     

Week 4 Variationist research

  • Meyerhoff, Miriam (2011) Language and variation. In: Introducing Sociolinguistics. London: Routledge, 8–26

Submission due: First learning journal reflection (500 words, 20%). Please see the detailed description in the “Assessments” document.

Week 5 Language contact 1: Language birth, maintenance, shift and death

  • Meyerhoff, Miriam (2011) Language contact. In: Introducing Sociolinguistics. London: Routledge, 238–264

Week 6 Language contact 2: Contact varieties

  • Mesthrie, Rajend (2013) Language contact 2: Pidgins, creoles and ‘New Englishes’. In: Rajend Mesthrie, Joan Swann, Ana Deumert, and William L. Leap. Introducing Sociolinguistics. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 271–307.

Week 7 ***Reading week, no class***
Please use Reading Week to catch up on readings you might have missed and to do your own literature research on topics in which you are interested.

Week 8 University Holiday on Monday ***no classes***
Submission due: Second reflection (500 words, 20%). Please see the detailed description in the “Assessments” document.

Week 9 Language planning and policy

  • Deumert, Ana (2013) Language planning and policy. In: Rajend Mesthrie, Joan Swann, Ana Deumert, and William L. Leap. Introducing Sociolinguistics. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 371–406.

Week 10 Linguistic attitudes and ideologies

  • Preston, Dennis R. (2010) Language with an attitude. In: Miriam Meyerhoff and Erik Schleef (eds.) The Routledge Sociolinguistics Reader. London: Routledge, 112–131.

Week 11 Language and identity

  • Staicov, Adina (2016) San Francisco Chinatown: Transnationalism, identity construction, and heritage language maintenance. In Mi-Cha Flubacher, Catherine Diederich and Philipp Dankel (eds.) Bulletin Vals-Asla 104: 67–85.

Week 12 Public Holiday on Monday ***no classes***

Week 13 World Englishes

  • Bolton, Kingsley (2000) The sociolinguistics of Hong Kong and the space for Hong Kong English. World Englishes 19(3): 265–285.

Week 14 Recap, essay writing guidelines, open discussion and closing

Submission due: Final paper (1500 words, 50%). Please see the detailed description in the “Assessments” document.


Semester
2019-2020 Second Semester
Credits
6.00
Contact Hours per week
3
Form of Assessment
100% coursework
Time
Monday , 12:30 pm - 2:20 pm , CPD-LG.09
Thursday , 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm , CPD-LG.09