Organisation


The course will consist of lectures on Monday mornings and tutorials on Thursday mornings. The lectures will provide students with detailed overviews of current issues and discussions in the field of language, communication and globalisation. The tutorials will be student-led and will offer opportunities for in-depth discussions of the weekly readings and introduce students to important study skills. In the latter half of the semester, students are asked to prepare short presentations on topics of their choice. Students are encouraged to make individual arrangements with Jaspal, at least once over the course of the semester, to discuss their written assignments and any other issues that might arise.

 

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Assessment


  • Assessment is 100% coursework, which comprises three components: A brief take-home key terms quiz (20%), an in-class presentation (20%) and a written assignment (60%).
  • All components of the assessment contribute towards the final grade for the course. A failure to complete any of the assessments will result in a 0 for that particular proportion of the grade.
  • Students who miss more than 3 classes, for whatever reason, will be considered as not having completed the course and will not receive a final grade.

 

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Tentative schedule


** as at July 2017; subject to change **

Week 1
Lecture, 14 January 2019: Introduction: Accounting for complexity
Tutorial, 17 January 2019: Initial assessment and orientation

Week 2
Lecture, 21 January 2019: Globalisation old and new  
Tutorial, 23 January 2019: Study skills: Critical reading

Week 3
Lecture, 28 January 2019: Superdiversity
Tutorial, 31 January 2019: Study skills: Referencing, citing and paraphrasing

Week 4
Lecture, 4 February 2019: Translanguaging and transculturation
Tutorial, 7 February 2019: *** Chinese New Year, no class ***

Week 5
Lecture, 11 February 2019: *** Chinese New Year, no class ***
Tutorial, 14 February 2019: Study skills: Translanguaging in your writing

Week 6
Lecture, 18 February 2019: World Englishes
Tutorial, 21 February 2019: Study skills: Presenting your research

Week 7
Submission due: Take-home key terms quiz (20% of final grade)
Lecture, 25 February 2019: Current issues in language and communication
Tutorial, 28 February 2019: Discussion/allocation of presentations

Week 8
Lecture, 4 March 2019 *** Reading Week, no class ***
Tutorial, 7 March 2019: *** Reading Week, no class ***

Week 9
Lecture, 11 March 2019: The Umbrella Movement
Tutorial, 14 March 2019: Student presentations

Week 10
Lecture, 18 March 2019: Hip hop in the global south
Tutorial, 21 March 2019: Student presentations

Week 11
Lecture, 25 March 2019: Migrant businesses in the global north
Tutorial, 28 March 2019: Student presentations

Week 12
Lecture, 1 April 2019: Globalisation from the periphery
Tutorial, 4 April 2019: Student presentations

Week 13
Lecture, 8 April 2019: Language policy and linguistic minorities in the nation-state
Tutorial, 11 April 2019: Student presentations

Week 14
Lecture, 15 April 2019: Europe’s refugee ‘crisis’ and raciolinguistic profiling
Tutorial, 18 April 2019: Student presentations

Week 15
Lecture, 22 April 2019: Recap and closing
Tutorial, 25 April 2019: No class, individual study time

17 May 2019
Submission due: Final written assignment (2000 words, 60% of final grade)

 

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Tentative reading list


** as at July 2017; subject to change **

General readings

Blommaert, Jan (2010) The Sociolinguistics of Globalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Collins, James P., Stef Slembrouck and Mike Baynham (eds.) (2009) Globalization and Language Contact: Scale, Migration, and Communicative Practices. London: Continuum.
Coupland, Nikolas (ed.) (2010) The Handbook of Language and Globalization. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
Canagarajah, Suresh A. (2013) Translingual Practice: Global Englishes and Cosmopolitan Relations. Abingdon: Routledge.
Vaish, Viniti (ed.) (2010) Globalization of Language and Culture in Asia: The Impact of Globalization Processes on Language. London: Continuum.

Assigned weekly readings (core readings in bold; students are expected to read core readings in preparation for class)

Week 1
Blommaert, Jan (2016) From mobility to complexity in sociolinguistic theory and method. In: Nikolas Coupland (ed.) Sociolinguistics: Theoretical Debates. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 242-261.
Like most readings in this list, this reading can be accessed online via HKU library. You can also download a pre-print version here: https://www.academia.edu/8113970/WP135_Blommaert_2014._From_mobility_to_complexity_in_sociolinguistic_theory_and_method)
Hannerz, Ulf (1992) The nature of culture today. In: Cultural Complexity: Studies in the Social Organization of Meaning. New York: Columbia University Press, 3-39.

Week 2
Canagarajah, Suresh A. (2013) Recovering translingual practices. In: Translingual Practice: Global Englishes and Cosmopolitan Relations. Abingdon: Routledge, 35-55.
Scholte, Jan Aart (2005) Globalization debates. In: Globalization: A Critical Introduction. 2nd edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
Week 3
Blommaert, Jan and Ben Rampton (2011) Language and superdiversity. Diversities 13(2): 1-22.
Hall, Kira (2014) Hypersubjectivity: Language anxiety, and indexical dissonance in globalization. Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 24(2): 261-273.
Vertovec, Steven (2007) Super-diversity and its implications. Ethnic and Racial Studies 30(6): 1024–1054.

Week 4
García, Orfelia and Li Wei (2014) The translanguaging turn and its impact. In Translanguaging: Language, Bilingualism and Education. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 19-44.
Jaspers, Jürgen and Lian Malai Madsen (2016) Sociolinguistics in a languagised world: Introduction. Applied Linguistics Review 7(3): 235-258.
Pennycook, Alastair (2016) Mobile times, mobile terms: The trans-super-poly-metro movement. In: Nikolas Coupland (ed.) Sociolinguistics: Theoretical Debates. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 201-217.

Week 5
Chinese New Year, no reading tasks.

Week 6
Kachru, Braj B. (1985) Standards, codification and sociolinguistic realism: The English language in the outer circle. In: Randolph Quirk and Henry Widdowson (eds.) English in the World: Teaching and Learning the Language and the Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 11-30.
Seargeant, Philip and Caroline Tagg (2011) English on the internet and a ‘post-varieties’ approach to language. World Englishes 30(4): 496-514.

Week 7
TBA

Week 8
Reading week
Please use this week to review completed readings and do your own literature research to deepen your knowledge of topics you find fascinating.

Week 9
Bhatia, Aditi (2015) Construction of discursive illusions in the ‘Umbrella Movement.’ Discourse & Society 26(4): 407-427.
Flowerdew, John (2017) Understanding the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement: A critical discourse historiographical approach. Discourse & Society 28(5): 453-472.
Hansen Edwards, Jette G. (2016) The politics of language and identity: Attitudes towards Hong Kong English pre and post the Umbrella Movement. Asian Englishes 18(2): 157-164.

Week 10
Pennycook, Alastair and Tony Mitchell (2009) Hip-Hop as dusty foot philosophy: Engaging locality. In: H. Samy Alim, Awad Ibrahim and Alastair Pennycook (eds.) Global Linguistic Flows: Hip Hop Cultures, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language. New York: Routledge, pp. 25-42.
Williams, Quentin E. (2012) The enregisterment of English in rap braggadocio: A study from English-Afrikaans bilingualism in Cape Town. English Today 28(2): 54-59.
Wilson, Michael J. (2011) ‘Making space, pushing time’: A Sudanese hip-hop group and their wardrobe-recording studio. International Journal of Cultural Studies 15(1): 47-64.
Singh, Jaspal Naveel and Ethiraj Gabriel Dattatreyan (2016) Cultural interventions: Repositioning hip hop education in India. Linguistics & Education 36(1): 55-64.

Week 11
Blackledge, Adrian, Angela Creese and Rachel Hu (2017) Everyday encounters in the marketplace: Translanguaging in the superdiverse city. In: Anna de Fina, Didem Ikizoglu and Jeremy Wegner (eds.) Diversity and Super-Diversity: Sociocultural Linguistic Perspectives. Georgetown: Georgetown University Press, 97-116.
Pennycook, Alastair and Emi Otsuji (2017) Fish, phone cards and semiotic assemblages in two Bangladeshi shops in Sidney and Tokyo. Social Semiotics 27(4): 434-450.

Week 12
Omoniyi, Tope (2014) A borderlands’ perspective on language and globalization. International Journal of the Sociology of Language.
Heller, Monica (2013) Repositioning the multilingual periphery: Class, language, and transnational markets in Francophone Canada. In: Sari Pietkainen and Helen Kelly-Holmes (eds.) Multilingualism and the Periphery. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 17-34.
Singh, Jaspal Naveel and Tom Bartlett (2017) Negotiating sustainability across scales: Community organising in the Outer Hebrides. AILA Review 30: 50-71. 

Week 13
TBA

Week 14
Eades, Diana (2005) Applied linguistics and language analysis in asylum seeker cases. Applied Linguistics 4(1): 503-526.
Blommaert, Jan (2001) Investigating narrative inequality: African asylum seekers’ stories in Belgium. Discourse & Society 12(4): 413-449.
Flores, Nelson and Jonathan Rosa (2015) Undoing appropriateness: Raciolinguistic ideologies and language diversity in education. Harvard Educational Review 85(2): 149-171.

 

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Last updated: 13 July 2018